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Visit The Shire

Destinations

Cronulla
Como
Kurnell
Engadine
Bundeena
Gymea
Woronora


Cronulla

Birds eye view of Cronulla coastline

Blessed with Sydney’s longest stretch of sand on one side and the pristine waterways of Port Hacking on the other, Cronulla is a stunning and relaxed coastal getaway. The area has something for everyone, beachside cafes and restaurants, surfing, snorkelling, fishing, shopping, bars, clubs and loads more. It’s also the only beach in Sydney accessible by train.


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Como

Birds eye view of Como

Experience the beauty and tranquillity of this secluded gem nestled on the edge of the Georges River. With an abundance of native flora and fauna, rich in history and heritage, Como is only 40 minutes by train from the Sydney CBD and all attractions are within walking distance of each other.

Named in 1888 by local, James Murphy, because the scenery reminded him of Lake Como in Italy, Como’s attractions retain much of their original late nineteenth century charm.


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Kurnell

Birds Eye view of Kurnell

The Kurnell Peninsula is well known for its significant early history and is fast becoming known as a great location for whale watching during the winter months, as well as Scuba Diving, Fishing and Surfing.

Kurnell is the place where Lieutenant James Cook (later Captain) first stepped foot on Australian soil in 1770. You can retrace his steps and check out the monument marking the site of his historic landing, or learn more about the peninsula’s original inhabitants in the Kamay Botany Bay National Park Visitors Centre.


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Engadine

Birds eye view of Engadine

With the Royal National Park to the East and Heathcote National Park to the West Engadine truly is a bushland retreat. The area features rolling sandstone cliffs, lush green native trees, the Engadine Wetlands to the East and on a clear night you can look across the Sydney Basin to view the Sydney CBD skyline.

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Bundeena

Birds eye view of Bundeena

Untouched beaches, the Royal National Park, cultural and historical walks, a thriving art scene, cosy B&Bs and aboriginal rock carvings are just a handful of the many attractions Bundeena has to offer…

The name Bundeena is an aboriginal word meaning “noise like thunder” and when you hear the waves lap up against the white sand its easy to understand why. You will find traces of the original inhabitants, the Dharawal people in rock carvings and middens throughout the area.

Bundeena has one of the highest concentrations of artists in NSW and it’s easy to see why they are drawn here. A 55km drive south of Sydney, or a relaxing ferry crossing from Cronulla, the area is saturated with some of the best scenery in the state. Shake off the dust of the city on a 2 day walk along the 26 kilometre coastal track to Otford (or just tackle a part of it). Chill out at a local cafe and be sure to explore the Bundeena & Maianbar Art Trail on the 1st Sunday of the month, the same day as the local markets.

Bundeena and Maianbar offer a wealth of beautiful scenery as well as plenty of outdoor activities, shops, cafes, and overnight accommodation, only an hour south of Central Sydney.


Gymea

Birds eye view of Gymea Bay

Gymea is a charming little village full of character. It is a cultural hub full of restaurants and cafes, an award winning chocolate factory, a contemporary regional art gallery and a retro club; The Vinyl Room. Take a wander down Gymea Bay road for a unique shopping experience, the southern end of the strip has some great home wares, gift and clothing stores.

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Woronora
Birds eye view of Woronora

One of Sydney's best kept secrets lies in the leafy grandeur of Woronora. A river valley, possessing pristine waterways, deep valleys and peaceful surroundings, it's a place of great beauty offering canoeing, kayaking, swimming, fishing, picnics and bushwalking. 

Once the domain of the indigenous Dharawal ‘freshwater people’, the mouth of the Woronora River was noted by the young adventurers Bass & Flinders during their exploration of the Georges River in 1795. Woronora is said to be an aboriginal word meaning ‘black rock’.


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